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Southern Paiute Veterans Honor Guard

Available for your Dedication Events, Special Functions, and Pow Wows!

Dalton Tom

Chair

Dalton TomSouthern Paiute Veterans
Association

EagleStaff

Harlan Bow

Co-Chair

Harlan BowSouthern Paiute Veterans
Association

BELOW PHOTOGRAPH

THE SOUTHERN PAIUTE VETERANS HONOR GUARD, 2007

Front Row, left to right: John Lee, Dalton Tom


Back Row, left to right: Tim Rogers, Harlan Bow,
Kenny Anderson, Ronnie Spute, and David Lee



2007 Honor Guard Members

Members, past and present, at the Southern Paiute Veterans Pow Wow, 2007

Grand Entry, 2014 Pow Wow







 

 

Some Honor Guard Galleries:
V A Hospital Dedication |Cedar City Pow Wow |Snow Mountain |
Ira H. Hayes Dedication |Pahrump Pow Wow |LVIntertribal Pow Wow |

 

 

 

ALL OUR BRAVE VETERANS,
Past & Present

In Spirit of Memory for all of our Soldiers, our Band of Brothers....

Merry Christmas 2019 & A Prospersous Happy New Year 2020!



In all the scattered places YOU may serve,

YOU ALL will be, FOREVER, in our HEARTS and MIND.

Soldier Christmas

 

 

 

 

 



 

SOUTHERN PAIUTE VETERANS

Southern Paiute Veterans Honor Guard

HONOR GUARD


Today we "HONOR ALL VETERANS."
"As America's Veterans of Many Faces, May the Great Warrior Spirit Be With You, Always, as WE ARE A BAND OF WARRIORS."
We greatly appreciate and Thank those who have put their time and effort for this great cause.
THANK YOU"
Dalton Tom


Band of Warriors, Remembering
Artist: William "Bill" Anderson
Moapa Band of Paiutes

SEPTEMBER 11, 2001

One Flag For Every Soul, 9 - 11 - 2001

SO WE NEVER
FORGET

Septermber 11th, 2001 was a day of horror and great sacrifice. We saw the attempt by those who would destroy a symbol of this nation. But we must never forget that the same day, we saw the basic character of our nation shine for what it was. While many fled from the devastation that day, many more rushed in. Our Fireman, Police and the never to be forgotten passengers of Flight 93 showed the world that they may attack us, but they will never destroy our basic character.
That day the contract between our protectors and citizens was renewed. The colors were passed from our citizens to our military. That renewal must never be forgotten and our nature must never be ignored.



 



THE TAPS CRYER

Taps Cryer

DALTON TOM
ARMY

 

The TAPS CRYER is a Special Dedication to all Fallen Warriors performed by Dalton Tom, wherein he fires one round with his Army Rifle to each of the Four Sacred Directions by firing one round in each direction, and then kneeling in a prayer attitude, sings the hymn of Taps in a soulful, mornful melody in the manner of a heartfelt wailing, for the loss of fellow warriors. This ceremony is performed at each Grand Entry of Pow Wows and other Official Functions of the Southern Paiute Veteras Association, by Dalton Tom, after the posting of the Colors. This "Crying of the Taps" is really a touching prayer ceremony, a crying for the lost warriors of many battles on many fronts.

 

Taps Cryer
Artist: William "Bill" Anderson
Moapa Band of Paiutes
CODE TALKERS

Code Talker

YODELL BILLAH
ARMY

 

The photograph above and below are two Code Talkers. Both warriors were Navajo, and most Code Talkers are associated with the Navajo or Dine' peoples. Few people realize the history of first using Code Talkers in military conflicts in this nation date to the use of Cherokee troops during September 1918 of World War I. The Choctaw helped the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I. During World War II, Comanche Code Talkers were at Normandy and Utah Beach. In East Africa, the Meskwaki Code Talkers were used, and the Basque Code Talkers were used in Hiroshima, China and the Philippines.

 

Code Talker

JOE MORRIS
MARINES

BATAAN SURVIVOR

Bataan Death March Survivor

TONY REYNA - TAOS
MARINES

A historic landmark in the annals of World War II, The Bataan Death March, forced 90,000 to 100,000 American and Filipino prisoners of war captured by the Japanese in the Philippines in the early stages of the war to walk their way to their prisoner of war camps. Starting out from Mariveles, on the southern end of the Bataan Peninsula, on April 9, 1942, they were forced-marched 55 miles to San Fernando, then taken by rail to Capas, from where they walked the final 8 miles to Camp O'Donnell. They were starved and mistreated, often kicked or beaten on their way, and many who fell were bayoneted. Some of those who fell were beheaded by Japanese officers who were practicing with their samurai swords, from horseback. Only 54,000 reached the camp: 7,000 - 10,000 died on the march.

We must teach our children not only what our freedoms and liberty are. We must also teach them how they were secured. That our nation was built on Liberty and Freedom, purchased at the price of the blood of patriots and warriors, and protected by the pain and sacrifice of succeeding generations.



 

IRA H. HAYES HONOR GUARD

Ira H. Hayes Honor Guard

Named in honor of the Late Ira. H. Hayes, World War II Veteran, and member of the Pima Tribe, and one of six Marines in the famous Iwo Jima flag-raising photo. The Honor Guard appears at many functions throughout Arizona, and was the first all Native Honor Guard to perform at the 65th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor, 2006. Members are part of the American Legion Post #84, based in Sacaton, Arizona, the home of Ira H. Hayes who died January 24, 1955.

Ira. H. Hayes

IRA H. HAYES

 

THE FLAG RAISINGIwo Jima Commemorative Photo


GOURD DANCERS

Veteran Gourd Dancers

The Gourd Dance is the traditional dance of the "Tdien-pei-gah" Kiowan warrior society. Tdien-pei-gah distantly refers to words meand skunkberry and brave. Originally gourds were used in the dance, but today saltshakers or small milk cans are often used. A Kiowa story recounts the tale of a young man who had been separated from the rest of the tribe. He saw a red wolf singing and dancing on its hind legs. The man listened to the songs all afternoon and night and when morning came, the wolf spoke to him and told him to take the dance and songs back to his people. The "howl" at the end of each gourd dance song is a tribute to the red wolf. The gourd dance was once a part of the Kiowa Sun Dance. The Gourd Dance is a man's dance. Women participate by dancing in place behind their male counterparts and outside the perimiter formed by the men. Some of the Gourd Dances that are held go on all afternnon and on into the evening when it finallys cools off enough so that more energetic Intertribal dances can begin. Some Tribal dances feature only Gourd Dancing. Each Gourd Dance Song is a form of a Prayer, and there are hundreds of songs passed down and on by many tribes who embrace the dance.



SOUTHERN PAIUTE VETERANS

 Southern Paiutes Veterans Honor Guard

The Southern Paiute Veterans Association was established in the year 1990, with the help and support of our Tribal Leaders. In wanting to Honor and Recognize our Native American Veterans who have served Honorably in our Armed Forces. These Veterans consist of Nine Paiute Bands, Southern Nevada, Southern Utah, and Northern Arizona. By recognizing our Veterans, with a Veterans Pow-Wow annually in November. Throughout the past years we have participated in Indian Conventions held here in Las Vegas, Nevada, and many Pow Wow, Parades, School Events, Military Burials, Viet Nam Memorial Wall Ceremonies, INFR, and many other events. The Southern Paiute Veterans Association has received numerous awards,


A BAND OF WARRIORS
A Band of Warriors
Southern Paiute Veterans Pow Wow

 

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